Report this comment
  • "the other councils he quotes have better services - for instance in social care of old people and care for vulnerable children and neither have had parts of their councils taken into special measures. you get what you pay for and there is no saying the people of pembrokeshire would not prefer better services that they pay for through proper council tax instead of low council tax, low standard services delivered by part time council staff and yet the highest paid senior officers (and senior councillors?) in Wales. it is not the vulnerable people of Pembrokeshire who benefit from that but only the senior council staff. Unfortunately the current PCC does not provide a good reason to keep any PCC."
  • This field is mandatory
  • This field is mandatory
  • Please note we will not accept reports with HTML tags or URLs in them.


  • Enter the above word in the box below

Beware huge Council Tax rises for Pembrokeshire public if local authority mergers go ahead - council leader

Pembrokeshire Council Tax payers would be forking out considerably more if potential local authority boundary changes go ahead, it was said this week.

Pembrokeshire County Council Leader, Councillor Jamie Adams, has compared the Pembrokeshire Council Tax rise of 3.4 per cent to what it have been had the council been amalgamated with neighbouring local authorities, as is proposed.

Councillor Adams said he regretted the increase of 3.4 per cent, even though it was the lowest in both cash and percentage terms in Wales.

However he stressed he was also deeply concerned that the people of Pembrokeshire should understand the financial implications of the Williams Report on local government reorganisation if it is adopted by the Welsh Government.

The report suggests two possibilities: amalgamating Pembrokeshire with Ceredigion or Pembrokeshire with Ceredigion and Carmarthenshire - the so called ‘new Dyfed’ option.

Councillor Adams said: “Had I been speaking not as the Leader of Pembrokeshire County Council but as Leader of ‘new Dyfed’, the Council Tax rise for those in Band D would not have been just 3.4 per cent but a whopping 26 per cent.

“That’s an extra £193 a year to Pembrokeshire Council Tax payers. For those in Band I it would be an eye-watering £450 increase.

“Likewise, were we to be twinned with Ceredigion, the Council Tax increase would have been 15.9 per cent or £118 a year.

“I think these massive increases speak for themselves and should provide food for thought for those who advocate local government reorganisation.”

Local Businesses

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree