Many drivers - for generations - have believed that driving with your car's inside lights on is illegal but it's actually a myth.

Most vehicles have some kind of interior light which is often called dome or courtesy lights.

You'll typically find these on the ceiling of your vehicle and they tend to light up when people get in and out of the car.


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The inside light is useful for allowing passengers to safely fasten their seatbelts as well as read maps and locate any items.

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But for the longest time, many motorists have been brought up thinking that it is illegal to drive with the inside white lights on.

This issue to a simple misunderstanding of the law.

Debunking common motoring myths, the AA noted that many drivers were told as children ( typically by their parents) not to turn the car's inside lights on while driving and that it was a crime.

The automobile company added: "It’s something which lots of people think is a fact but there’s no law against driving with your interior lights on".

However, the motoring experts did note that sorting the lights can be distracting or can interfere with your vision especially at night since the lights can reflect off of the inside of the windscreen.

Milford Mercury: Debunking common motoring myths, the AA noted that many drivers were told as children ( typically by their parents) not to turn the car's inside lights on while driving and that it was a crime. ( Getty Images)Debunking common motoring myths, the AA noted that many drivers were told as children ( typically by their parents) not to turn the car's inside lights on while driving and that it was a crime. ( Getty Images) (Image: Getty Images)

The AA added: "If you’re pulled over and it’s decided that your light was a probable cause in any bad driving, you can expect to get a careless driving charge though".


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The AA also reminded motorists that "there might not be specific laws forbidding certain actions and behaviours" but they should "avoid doing anything that could slow your reaction times and cause an otherwise avoidable accident".

Drivers should always obey the Highway Code - including Rule 148 which states that safe driving and riding needs concentration.

All distractions should be avoided including too much focus spent on talking with passengers, reading maps, eating and drinking, smoking and listening to loud music among others.